Tag Archives Tosan Aji

Ceremonial Keris Sajen Knife with Spirit Figurine Hilt and Pamor Wos Wutah Motif – Tangguh Majapahit Era (13th-15th Century CE)

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The period from the thirteenth to the fifteenth century during the reign of the Javanese Hindu empire of Majapahit (1293–1500 CE) is considered the golden age of Indonesian art and culture. Royal artisans from the Majapahit Kingdom produced many masterpieces of art, including various exclusive kerises and other pusaka (heirloom) treasures. However, from the many ...

Sacred Keris Sombro Ritual Dagger from the Tangguh Pajajaran (12th Century CE) with Pamor Kulit Semangka Pattern

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The Sombro dapur is a very special keris model that differs from any other sacred daggers from Indonesia. To begin with, a Sombro is much smaller than most other kerises. For instance, the standard length of a keris blade is approximately 33-38 cm, whereas the total length of the Sombro's blade measures only 19.5 cm. ...

Antique Sumatran Badik Sewar Dagger to Stimulate Extraordinary Bravery, Masculinity and Warrior Mentality

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The badik sewar is a traditional combat weapon from Sumatra, Indonesia. This type of badik looks similar to the traditional daggers used by the Bugis, Makassar and Mandar people of southern Sulawesi, Indonesia. Though the shape of the sewar's blade also has a lot in common with the Tumbuk Lada from the Riau Archipelago, located ...

East Javanese Keris Carita Gandu Luk 11 from the Hindu-Buddhist Tangguh Janggala Era (11th–12th Century CE)

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The ancient blade of this keris is forged from top-quality iron. Based on the extraordinary quality of iron and the remarkable forging skills of the empu (blacksmith), it is estimated that this keris was made in the tangguh Janggala era (11th–12th century CE) in East Java, Indonesia. After the Srivijaya invasion in the ancient Javanese ...

Keris Kebo Teki Luk 5 with Pamor Wos Wutah made in the Tangguh Tuban Era (14th Century CE)

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The majority of traditional Javanese Kebo dapur keris models has a straight blade. There are, however, a few exceptions, like the Kebo Dendeng and Dengen variants, which both have five waves (luk). Although this keris does has a waved-blade, it is neither a Dendeng nor Dengen type of Kebo; it is, in fact, a Kebo ...