Tag Archives Sajen

Ceremonial Keris Sajen Knife with Spirit Figurine Hilt and Pamor Wos Wutah Motif – Tangguh Majapahit Era (13th-15th Century CE)

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The period from the thirteenth to the fifteenth century during the reign of the Javanese Hindu empire of Majapahit (1293–1500 CE) is considered the golden age of Indonesian art and culture. Royal artisans from the Majapahit Kingdom produced many masterpieces of art, including various exclusive kerises and other pusaka (heirloom) treasures. However, from the many ...

Ancient Ritual Keris Sajen Dagger for Enhanced Performance of Ceremonial Acts (e.g. Offerings, Prayer and Meditation)

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The keris sajen is a special type of ritual dagger used for ceremonial acts, such as offerings, prayer and meditation. This remarkably refined dapur keris model originates from the historically renown tangguh Majapahit era (1292–1500 CE); i.e. the golden age of Hindu-Buddhist Javanese culture, art and architecture. The seemingly simplistic yet undeniably subtle design of ...

Keris Sajen Luk 3 with an Iron Hilt featuring the Image of a Bhūta Spirit

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With its moderate size and unique design, the keris Sajen stands out from the rest of Indonesia's traditional dapur keris models. Since ancient times, the keris Sajen is typically used by mystics in their performance of ritual practice. Hence, the Javanese term 'sajen' literally translates as (ritual) offerings. The hilt of the keris Sajen comprises ...

Original Keris Sajen Sepuh from the Legendary Majapahit Era

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A classic and original keris from the heydays of the legendary Javanese Majapahit empire. The characteristic model of this ancient keris is called 'dapur Sajen'. Foreign research studies on this type of keris often use the general term 'keris Majapahit' for this kind of dapur. Yet one must take notice, that this term is rather ...

Keris Sajen for Ritual and Spiritual Uses

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A rare and unique keris Sajen from the tangguh Majapahit era (13th–15th century). This ancient keris features the dapur Sajen, which means 'offerings' in Javanese. As always with a keris Sajen, the hilt is inseparably attached to the iron blade. The blade has three waves ('luk'), which is something unusual and rather unique indeed, for ...