Tag Archives Kejawen / Kebatinan

Javanese Semar and Petruk Divinities Coin Amulet

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Semar and Petruk both are Javanese divinities, belonging to the group of four Punakawan (pronounced: Punokawan) deities. Semar is the eldest among them, followed by Bagong, Petruk, and Gareng. Petruk has a very fierce character, whereas Semar is characterized by peace and wisdom. Legend has it that Petruk used to be a benevolent rākṣasa demon. ...

Kejawen Talisman with Handwritten Kalacakra Spell for Removal of Bad Luck and Evasion of Hostility

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Kalacakra in both Sanskrit and Javanese means 'wheel of time' ('kala': time; 'cakra': wheel). 'Kala' also refers to the Lord of Time; i.e., Baṭṭhara Kala, a deity in the Hindu and Buddhist pantheon. Indeed, kalacakra is a key term in ancient Indian philosophy and religion (most notably in Hinduism and Buddhism), as well as in ...

The Kejawen Teachings: ‘Personal Guardian Spirits’ (eZine)

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Indo Magic proudly presents The Kejawen Teachings: 'Personal Guardian Spirits' – the latest digital publication by Mas Rodin. This is the very first issue of Indo Magic's new eZine called 'The Kejawen Teachings', which offers valuable resources to mystics wishing to deepen their study of Kejawen teachings. After the success of 'Mantras: Sacred Utterances from Indonesia' ...

Magic Magnolia Flower Oil with a Soothing and Calming Fragrance that Promotes Love, Peace and Harmony

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The essential oil contained within the Indonesian amulet vial is obtained from fragrant champaca flowers of the magnolia tree (Lat. Magnolia champaca, or Michelia champaca). According to traditional Hindu and Buddhist beliefs in Southeast Asian cultures, including Kejawen and Kebatinan tradition in Indonesia, Magnolia trees are believed to be the dwelling place of benevolent nature ...

Kebatinan Amulet to Reveal Occult Knowledge by Means of Shamanic Contact with the Spirit World

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'Kebatinan' is an Indonesian term that refers to modern Javanese mysticism. The majority of contemporary mystics in Indonesia is Muslim, for indeed, Islam has left a deep imprint on Javanese culture. Due to the Islamization of Java (c. 1200–1600 CE), the traditional Javanese belief system (i.e., kejawen) gradually shifted towards Islamic mysticism. Consequently, spiritual orientations ...